Kristopher Sandoval

Kristopher Sandoval

Kristopher is a web developer and author who writes on security and business. He has been writing articles for Nordic APIs since 2015.

Posts By: Kristopher Sandoval

Functional vs. Useful: What Makes a Useful API?

It’s a very easy thing to say that if an API exists, then it’s useful. After all, if a developer creates an API, they must have created it for some purpose. However, what is functional isn’t always useful, and conversely, what is useful isn’t always functional. Read more

Microservice Showdown – REST vs SOAP vs Apache Thrift (And Why It Matters)

The world of APIs is changing. While the early API landscape was largely dominated by monoliths, or an application which provides all of its services through a giant, singular application, the modern API development architecture has been steadily moving towards microservices. Read more

Equipping Your API With The Right Armor

APIs are as vast and varied as the systems that depend on them; while some systems may handle client data, payments, and collaborative research, other APIs may handle less important data such as social media and image sharing.

Due to the variations in application and usage, APIs face a unique set of considerations and issues arising from their availability that no other system faces – the difference between having an API for public consumption or one intended for internal use, in certain circumstances, can mean the difference between megalithic success and catastrophic failure. Read more

api security

API Security: The 4 Defenses of The API Stronghold

At one point or another, your secure resources will be attacked. This is the unfortunate reality of the modern era, where the skills necessary to invasively crack open a system, network, or API are more commonplace than ever. Millions in resources and potential revenue can be lost in a matter of hours due to poor planning and implementation of a security protocol. Read more

Success vs. Failure – The Importance of API Metrics

Success and failure are relatively subjective terms — what defines success for one business might be considered a failure for another, and the relative of success in certain areas of performance can change from industry to industry, department to department, and even on a case to case basis. Read more