Kristopher Sandoval

Kristopher Sandoval

Kristopher is a web developer and author who writes on security and business. He has been writing articles for Nordic APIs since 2015.

Posts By: Kristopher Sandoval

Introducing The API Security Maturity Model

When a user utilizes a service, that user must first attest they are who they say they are. In most use cases, they must then confirm they can do what they’re trying to do. For many users, this is a relatively non-transparent process, and it might seem to happen magically behind the scenes. Read more

10+ Tools To Mock HTTP Requests

Mocking HTTP requests is a vital part of any testing regiment. The ability to test a wide range of possible situations, realities and use cases is extremely important, and it presents a great opportunity to really future proof your API. What tool you use to implement this does matter – your tool should be able to mock common API interactions and HTTP request flows, and most importantly, it should be appropriate to your given code base and situation. Read more

AsyncAPI: 2020’s Industry Standard For Messaging APIs?

The industry is made up of a wide variety of implementations, solutions, and frameworks. Within this cloud of competing systems, the messaging API fights for a very specific, often niche section of development efforts. The quest to find a strong standard for these types of APIs, then, is a continuing effort. Read more

Review of Optic

We review Optic, a tool for auto-documenting and testing APIs

There are few things as important to the API developer experience as API specifications and API documentation. Both provide a vital conduit between the API provider and developer user, expressing critical information on functional aspects of the API. Read more

What is CORS?

APIs are complex webs of interconnected applications, interfaces, frontends, and backends. Making sense of these systems is not always easy to do. When so much of the data coming into a system is from external sources that run the gamut from trusted to untrusted, known to unknown, the easiest way to classify that data is to classify it by the source origin – that is, to not talk about the nature of the data, but rather the nature of that which sent the data. Read more