Posts Tagged: query language

Is GraphQL Moving Toward Ubiquity?

In a speech at the 2016 GraphQL Summit, Lee Byron of GraphQL/Facebook put forward a “Secret Master Plan” outlining his hopes for GraphQL, the growing API standard.

In an ideal world, he said, he hoped that GraphQL adoption would look something like this:

  • 1–3 months – Hobbyists and personal projects
  • 6 months – Implemented in 3+ languages
  • 9–12 months – New startups and small companies
  • 1.5–2 years – Medium sized companies and products
  • 2 years – Implemented in 10+ languages (actually took ~3 months)
  • 2–4 years – Large companies and tech giants
  • 4–5 years – Ubiquity!
Read more

7 Unique Benefits of Using GraphQL in Microservices

This post is included in our eBook on GraphQL. Download a free copy here!

We’ve talked about GraphQL at length previously, and for very good reason – GraphQL is, in many ways, one of the more powerful tools an API provider has in terms of providing singular endpoints to the consumer and controlling data flow. Read more

Security Points to Consider Before Implementing GraphQL

GraphQL is a very powerful query language that does a great many things right. When implemented properly, GraphQL offers an extremely elegant methodology for data retrieval, more backend stability, and increased query efficiency.

The key here though is that simple phrase — when implemented properly. Read more

Is GraphQL The End of REST Style APIs?

The world of APIs is one of innovation and constant iteration. The technologies that once drove the largest and best solutions across the web have been supplanted by new, more innovative solutions.

That is why it’s surprising, then, that many developers have clung to what they consider the bastions of web API development. Read more

10 GraphQL Consoles in Action

Most web API providers probably already know about GraphQL by now. It’s the API query modeling language making waves throughout the API industry, allowing developer users to interact with a web API in an arguably cleaner method. The industry is still divided, though. Read more