Posts Tagged: Facebook

Interview With GraphQL Co-Creator Lee Byron

We recently sat down with GraphQL co-creator Lee Byron to learn about the history and future of GraphQL. Hope you enjoy!

The Origins and Future of GraphQL

Ten years ago Lee Byron was a graphics engineer designing interactive news graphics at the New York Times when a friend approached him to join a small social media startup based in San Francisco, California. Read more

Learning From The Cambridge Analytica Incident

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock, you probably have read a lot about data privacy in the headlines recently, specifically regarding the Facebook and Cambridge Analytica debacle. As reported by all major news outlets, the story goes that Cambridge Analytica harvested Facebook data through a quiz app that took the personal information from friends of users without knowledge or consent; an estimated 50 million Facebook accounts. Read more

Is GraphQL Moving Toward Ubiquity?

In a speech at the 2016 GraphQL Summit, Lee Byron of GraphQL/Facebook put forward a “Secret Master Plan” outlining his hopes for GraphQL, the growing API standard.

In an ideal world, he said, he hoped that GraphQL adoption would look something like this:

  • 1–3 months – Hobbyists and personal projects
  • 6 months – Implemented in 3+ languages
  • 9–12 months – New startups and small companies
  • 1.5–2 years – Medium sized companies and products
  • 2 years – Implemented in 10+ languages (actually took ~3 months)
  • 2–4 years – Large companies and tech giants
  • 4–5 years – Ubiquity!
Read more

What The GraphQL Patent Release Means For the API Industry

GraphQL has driven much of the conversation around modern API web design, and for good reason — it’s powerful, extensible, and very useful for high data query applications. The ability to request data in a predetermined, knowable format, and the ability to collate endpoints into a single external point, has made GraphQL something that powers some pretty huge projects. Read more

Introduction to API Versioning Best Practices

Change is inevitable and growth is a good thing. When your API has reached the point of expanding beyond it’s original intent and capacity, it’s time to consider the next version.

Whether that next iteration is a whole number version bump or just a feature expansion, it’s important to consider the pros and cons of how you let your developers know about it. Read more