Posts Tagged: development

Building Fullstack, Serverless GraphQL APIs in the Cloud

A powerful query language for APIs, GraphQL has long been appreciated for its data-integration capabilities. GraphQL allows developers to extract pertinent data from their APIs without added fluff. In turn, apps can precisely control what data they get. Whereas traditional RESTful setups rely on server requests, GraphQL assumes control of data retrieval. Read more

Comparing Tools For GraphQL Schema Stitching: Hasura vs. Apollo

In the world of microservices, an API could reference tens or more services within a single function. This significantly elevated functionality has unfortunately brought with it some greater complexity.

One way to deal with such complexity is schema stitching. Stitching is a robust process that ties many microservices under a single relational network. Read more

8 Open-Source Frameworks for Building APIs in Python

Python is a highly-capable language, primed to handle the rigors of API development. Popularized by major companies and smaller development teams, Python is applauded for its user-friendliness. However, Python owes much of that usability to various development platforms.

We always appreciate when developer communities collaborate to build smarter tools, and luckily, a plethora of open-source frameworks have burst onto the scene and matured. Read more

Using Hypermedia To Design Event-Driven UIs

Some of the most powerful tech is now built fully on an API backbone. Web APIs are great because they can deliver data and functionality over HTTP — or other protocols — meaning agnostic client platforms, easier evolvability, and more efficient designs. Read more

Balancing Client And Server Caching in Web Application Development

Above all else, API communication is really a negotiation between the client and the server. Once we clear all the dust, this basic communication underlies every protocol, architecture, and approach. These negotiations are often complex, and deciding who has the responsibility for what aspect of this negotiated communication is an age-old conversation. Read more